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Table 4.

Possible discussion questions.

Initial Postgame Questions (Small Group Discussion)
  1. What does it mean to be the winner of one round of the game? What about the winner of multiple rounds (if that occurred)?

  2. How do the population sizes of the different species compare across the rounds of play?

  3. Do you notice any overall trends as the game progressed?

  4. Why might some plant species end up with larger populations than others?

  5. Give an example of a species that moves backward on the game board when trying to colonize certain habitats. Why do you think this species moves backward instead of forward?

  6. Do you think your plant is an exotic species or a native species? Why?

  7. On the basis of your experiences playing the game and the information on your Plant Information Card, describe the features of your plant species to the other players in your group. Is your species susceptible to fire? Does it produce lots of seeds? Which habitats can it successfully colonize? Is your species a strong competitor with other plants?

  8. If you introduced management cards to the game, did you notice any difference in that round of play?

 
 
Science Content Questions (Completed as a Small Group or as Individuals) 
  1. What did you learn from the game about the adaptations of each plant species? (e.g., Does it tolerate disturbance? Does it produce lots of seeds?)

  2. Based on the game results, in what habitat is each plant species likely to grow most successfully?

  3. Based on the game results, which species were the most successful? (e.g., Which ones had the largest populations? Which ones were able to colonize the most habitats?)

  4. What characteristics/adaptations do you think enabled these species to be successful?

  5. Give examples of any pivotal interactions or events that gave a particular species an advantage.

  6. What are the potential problems of introducing a species into a new habitat?

  7. Name two ways in which an invasive species such as the ones included in this game might affect the environment.

  8. Describe two ways in which you think a non-native species might be introduced into a new environment.

  9. If the results from the game were in your backyard, how do you think that would influence the biodiversity in your yard? If you were to scale up game results, how might invasion influence global biodiversity?

 
 
Analysis Questions (Large Group Discussion) 
  1. How did results differ between groups in the class?

  2. If any groups had different results, why might this be the case? What are the implications for predicting future invasions?

  3. Were there any class-wide trends? Were certain types of plants consistently able to outcompete others?

  4. Are only exotic species invasive?

  5. Based on game play, which species might be more successful in disturbed habitats?

  6. If all groups used the management cards in later rounds, what effects did the cards have on the outcome of the game?

  7. Give two examples of disturbances that benefit some species while limiting others.

  8. Suggest ways in which we could limit the spread of invasive species.

  9. Are there any benefits of invasive species; if so, can you think of a specific example?

  10. In your opinion, in what ways is the game, as a model, incomplete or inaccurate? Give examples.

 
Initial Postgame Questions (Small Group Discussion)
  1. What does it mean to be the winner of one round of the game? What about the winner of multiple rounds (if that occurred)?

  2. How do the population sizes of the different species compare across the rounds of play?

  3. Do you notice any overall trends as the game progressed?

  4. Why might some plant species end up with larger populations than others?

  5. Give an example of a species that moves backward on the game board when trying to colonize certain habitats. Why do you think this species moves backward instead of forward?

  6. Do you think your plant is an exotic species or a native species? Why?

  7. On the basis of your experiences playing the game and the information on your Plant Information Card, describe the features of your plant species to the other players in your group. Is your species susceptible to fire? Does it produce lots of seeds? Which habitats can it successfully colonize? Is your species a strong competitor with other plants?

  8. If you introduced management cards to the game, did you notice any difference in that round of play?

 
 
Science Content Questions (Completed as a Small Group or as Individuals) 
  1. What did you learn from the game about the adaptations of each plant species? (e.g., Does it tolerate disturbance? Does it produce lots of seeds?)

  2. Based on the game results, in what habitat is each plant species likely to grow most successfully?

  3. Based on the game results, which species were the most successful? (e.g., Which ones had the largest populations? Which ones were able to colonize the most habitats?)

  4. What characteristics/adaptations do you think enabled these species to be successful?

  5. Give examples of any pivotal interactions or events that gave a particular species an advantage.

  6. What are the potential problems of introducing a species into a new habitat?

  7. Name two ways in which an invasive species such as the ones included in this game might affect the environment.

  8. Describe two ways in which you think a non-native species might be introduced into a new environment.

  9. If the results from the game were in your backyard, how do you think that would influence the biodiversity in your yard? If you were to scale up game results, how might invasion influence global biodiversity?

 
 
Analysis Questions (Large Group Discussion) 
  1. How did results differ between groups in the class?

  2. If any groups had different results, why might this be the case? What are the implications for predicting future invasions?

  3. Were there any class-wide trends? Were certain types of plants consistently able to outcompete others?

  4. Are only exotic species invasive?

  5. Based on game play, which species might be more successful in disturbed habitats?

  6. If all groups used the management cards in later rounds, what effects did the cards have on the outcome of the game?

  7. Give two examples of disturbances that benefit some species while limiting others.

  8. Suggest ways in which we could limit the spread of invasive species.

  9. Are there any benefits of invasive species; if so, can you think of a specific example?

  10. In your opinion, in what ways is the game, as a model, incomplete or inaccurate? Give examples.

 
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