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Table 2

Sample equity domain statements from SFSE Programs in the U.S. and Canada. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/elementa.428.t2

Equity Statements & Discourses EmployedSample Program DescriptionSample PLOSample Course Description

 
  • (In)Equity

  • (In)Equality

  • Food Sovereignty

  • Discrimination

  • (Anti)Oppression

  • Marginalization

  • Social Justice

  • Food Justice

  • Environmental Justice

  • (In)Just(ice)

  • Socioeconomic (in)Equity

  • Gender/Sexism

  • Race(ism)

  • Ability (physical, mental)

  • Sexual Orientation (homophobic, transphobic)

 
This program is designed for students who seek to shift global, industrial food systems towards more equitable, just, and sustainable foodways. Food justice can be measured through a community’s ability to acquire healthy food (food access), and its right to define its own food systems (food sovereignty). Students should also tailor their assignments in all courses to ensure that they deepen their understanding of how institutional racism and classism prevent certain communities from accessing healthy and culturally appropriate food so that sustainable food systems solutions can be developed. Identify, analyze, and evaluate contemporary and historical factors that affect food supply and food security, including environmental issues and issues of power and social justice (e.g., labor, economic, environmental, racial and gender equity). If food is a basic human right, how do societies create universal access to food? What is the moral ethical basis for making citizens food secure in an age of global inequality? To what extent does providing food access need to consider culturally appropriateness, nutrition, and sustainability, and justice? 
 In what ways have poor people and people of color been historically dispossessed and marginalized in the food system? Develop personal ethics that motivate action to alleviate injustice and exploitation in food systems.  
Equity Statements & Discourses EmployedSample Program DescriptionSample PLOSample Course Description

 
  • (In)Equity

  • (In)Equality

  • Food Sovereignty

  • Discrimination

  • (Anti)Oppression

  • Marginalization

  • Social Justice

  • Food Justice

  • Environmental Justice

  • (In)Just(ice)

  • Socioeconomic (in)Equity

  • Gender/Sexism

  • Race(ism)

  • Ability (physical, mental)

  • Sexual Orientation (homophobic, transphobic)

 
This program is designed for students who seek to shift global, industrial food systems towards more equitable, just, and sustainable foodways. Food justice can be measured through a community’s ability to acquire healthy food (food access), and its right to define its own food systems (food sovereignty). Students should also tailor their assignments in all courses to ensure that they deepen their understanding of how institutional racism and classism prevent certain communities from accessing healthy and culturally appropriate food so that sustainable food systems solutions can be developed. Identify, analyze, and evaluate contemporary and historical factors that affect food supply and food security, including environmental issues and issues of power and social justice (e.g., labor, economic, environmental, racial and gender equity). If food is a basic human right, how do societies create universal access to food? What is the moral ethical basis for making citizens food secure in an age of global inequality? To what extent does providing food access need to consider culturally appropriateness, nutrition, and sustainability, and justice? 
 In what ways have poor people and people of color been historically dispossessed and marginalized in the food system? Develop personal ethics that motivate action to alleviate injustice and exploitation in food systems.  
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