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Table 7.
Potential formal and informal assessments of student learning following completion of in-class photosynthesis and cellular respiration simulation activity.
Potential assessment:Example:
Draw a figure Draw the path of BOTH matter and energy through the processes of cellular respiration and photosynthesis. 
Generate a table Complete summary tables with information gathered during the simulation, as shown in Figures 5 and 7. 
Describe the path Describe the path of a single electron or one carbon atom through cellular respiration and/or photosynthesis. 
Apply to experimental results Explain the results from Joseph Priestley's experiment in which a mouse died after being placed in an enclosed jar, but survived when a plant was added to the jar. 
Edit inaccurate statements Edit the following example statements: (1) A plant is kept in the dark for three days, but watered normally. The plant loses dry weight because it cannot conduct photosynthesis. (2) Sunny lost 100 lbs over four weeks, and all her lost weight was converted into ATP. 
Multiple choice questions: principles of conservation of matter and energy What is the source of energy for building sugars in the Calvin cycle? Where are electrons released from electron carriers transferred in oxidative phosphorylation? Other sample questions can be found in Wilson et al. 2006, Parker et al. 2011, and Hartley et al. 2011. 
Multiple choice questions: application of concepts to real world situations Multiple-choice or essay questions in which students are required to apply the simulation to real world situations. For example: A tree increases in mass over the summer; what is the primary source of dry mass for the growth of this tree? More sample questions can be found in Wilson et al. 2006, Parker et al. 2011, and Hartley et al. 2011. 
Potential assessment:Example:
Draw a figure Draw the path of BOTH matter and energy through the processes of cellular respiration and photosynthesis. 
Generate a table Complete summary tables with information gathered during the simulation, as shown in Figures 5 and 7. 
Describe the path Describe the path of a single electron or one carbon atom through cellular respiration and/or photosynthesis. 
Apply to experimental results Explain the results from Joseph Priestley's experiment in which a mouse died after being placed in an enclosed jar, but survived when a plant was added to the jar. 
Edit inaccurate statements Edit the following example statements: (1) A plant is kept in the dark for three days, but watered normally. The plant loses dry weight because it cannot conduct photosynthesis. (2) Sunny lost 100 lbs over four weeks, and all her lost weight was converted into ATP. 
Multiple choice questions: principles of conservation of matter and energy What is the source of energy for building sugars in the Calvin cycle? Where are electrons released from electron carriers transferred in oxidative phosphorylation? Other sample questions can be found in Wilson et al. 2006, Parker et al. 2011, and Hartley et al. 2011. 
Multiple choice questions: application of concepts to real world situations Multiple-choice or essay questions in which students are required to apply the simulation to real world situations. For example: A tree increases in mass over the summer; what is the primary source of dry mass for the growth of this tree? More sample questions can be found in Wilson et al. 2006, Parker et al. 2011, and Hartley et al. 2011. 
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