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Table 2.
Contexts for teaching about race.
Contexts, QuestionsOptionsSuggested Approaches
Before class
(What will students do to prepare for class?) 
Readings 1. Pick a reading outside of your textbook, unless this topic is explicitly covered.
2. Reading quizzes enforce key concepts from readings. 
 Activities 1. Implicit bias or privilege tests challenge students to consider internalized ideas or unrealized privileges. 
During class
(What will students do in class?) 
Lecture 1. In general education courses, discussions cannot be closely monitored; use mini-lectures to convey content between activities. 
 Activities 1. Exploratory activities (or labs) allow students to collect data and explore why notions of biological races are invalid.
2. Reflective activities allow students to articulate understanding and apply concepts; allow faculty to check/correct misunderstandings.
3. Case studies (e.g., using historical or comparative census data to explain cultural variation in racial categories). 
After class
(What will students do to reflect on their learning?) 
Homework 1. Challenge students to apply concepts learned in class (e.g., teach a friend this perspective, develop plan to address racism in real life). 
Contexts, QuestionsOptionsSuggested Approaches
Before class
(What will students do to prepare for class?) 
Readings 1. Pick a reading outside of your textbook, unless this topic is explicitly covered.
2. Reading quizzes enforce key concepts from readings. 
 Activities 1. Implicit bias or privilege tests challenge students to consider internalized ideas or unrealized privileges. 
During class
(What will students do in class?) 
Lecture 1. In general education courses, discussions cannot be closely monitored; use mini-lectures to convey content between activities. 
 Activities 1. Exploratory activities (or labs) allow students to collect data and explore why notions of biological races are invalid.
2. Reflective activities allow students to articulate understanding and apply concepts; allow faculty to check/correct misunderstandings.
3. Case studies (e.g., using historical or comparative census data to explain cultural variation in racial categories). 
After class
(What will students do to reflect on their learning?) 
Homework 1. Challenge students to apply concepts learned in class (e.g., teach a friend this perspective, develop plan to address racism in real life). 
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