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Table 2.
Related sets of Learning Performances in the Sprawl unit that build toward meeting the two NGSS Performance Expectations indicated.
Instructional ActivityLearning PerformancePerformance Expectation
Students investigate succession in their area, and at a prairie site. Students are able to arrange images of successional stages in prairie ecosystems through analyzing the levels of biodiversity shown. HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but that changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem
Students investigate biodiversity in their area, as a “way in” to analyze patterns in biodiversity data related to patchiness in prairie ecosystems. Students are able to demonstrate understanding that biodiversity in prairie ecosystems is distributed in patches. 
Students analyze graphical data on the interaction of fire and grazing in determining prairie biodiversity Students are able to attribute biodiversity patterns in the data to the interaction of grazing and fire. 
Students analyze natural history data for prairie species such as bison and prairie chicken. Students are able to identify the resources required to sustain a population of the selected species. 
Students analyze satellite images to investigate the impact of different suburban designs on the environment, on biodiversity, and on human well-being. Students are able to identify patterns of impact related to conventional, sustainable, and new urbanist neighborhood designs. HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity
Students explore numerical data on the energy subsidies required for different agricultural land uses. Students are able to compare the energy subsidies required by traditional and sustainable agriculture. 
Students use microcosms to investigate the impact of different environmental conditions on plant net primary productivity, and translate this into carbon uptake. Students are able to identify how varying abiotic conditions impact plant productivity. 
Students examine and analyze plant productivity in an agricultural field and in native prairie. Students are able to develop models of the inputs and outputs of energy required to support farming versus native prairie. 
Students use their energy input and output models to choose particular kinds of land use. Students are able to use evidence to support their chosen land use plan. 
Instructional ActivityLearning PerformancePerformance Expectation
Students investigate succession in their area, and at a prairie site. Students are able to arrange images of successional stages in prairie ecosystems through analyzing the levels of biodiversity shown. HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but that changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem
Students investigate biodiversity in their area, as a “way in” to analyze patterns in biodiversity data related to patchiness in prairie ecosystems. Students are able to demonstrate understanding that biodiversity in prairie ecosystems is distributed in patches. 
Students analyze graphical data on the interaction of fire and grazing in determining prairie biodiversity Students are able to attribute biodiversity patterns in the data to the interaction of grazing and fire. 
Students analyze natural history data for prairie species such as bison and prairie chicken. Students are able to identify the resources required to sustain a population of the selected species. 
Students analyze satellite images to investigate the impact of different suburban designs on the environment, on biodiversity, and on human well-being. Students are able to identify patterns of impact related to conventional, sustainable, and new urbanist neighborhood designs. HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity
Students explore numerical data on the energy subsidies required for different agricultural land uses. Students are able to compare the energy subsidies required by traditional and sustainable agriculture. 
Students use microcosms to investigate the impact of different environmental conditions on plant net primary productivity, and translate this into carbon uptake. Students are able to identify how varying abiotic conditions impact plant productivity. 
Students examine and analyze plant productivity in an agricultural field and in native prairie. Students are able to develop models of the inputs and outputs of energy required to support farming versus native prairie. 
Students use their energy input and output models to choose particular kinds of land use. Students are able to use evidence to support their chosen land use plan. 
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