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Table 1
Typical development and testing of Jenga “theories.” Column A lists the facts to be explained; Column B presents explanations that are typical of student groups; Column C gives predictions that, if incorrect, could falsify the corresponding theory.
Observed FactsCompeting “Theories” of JengaPredictions
The Jenga box is common in houses.
In some houses the blocks are arranged into towers.
When a tower is present, there is a box nearby.
No two towers are exactly alike.
Towers always contain 54 blocks.
“Jenga” is written on the side of each block.
All blocks have the same dimensions.
There are more open spaces in the bottom half of the towers than in the top half.
The towers have varying degrees of stability. 
They record family histories. Blocks are moved in response to important family events – births, deaths, marriages.
They are religious icons. The positioning of blocks corresponds to the completion of religious rituals.
They are seismometers. Geologists use them to identify the epicenters of earthquakes.
They are indicators of social status. The positions of the blocks represent the family's perception of its place in broader society.
They are a product of an architectural competition. Families were competing to win a contract for a new building. 
Houses with larger families (as indicated by number of beds, range of clothing sizes, etc.) should have more complex towers.
The community should have one or more common meeting places where a replica of the tower is present.
Houses with collapsed towers should be in the same vicinity.
There should be a correlation between the apparent wealth of a family (as judged by the quality and number of possessions) and the complexity of the tower.
There should be public advertisements for the Jenga competition. 
Observed FactsCompeting “Theories” of JengaPredictions
The Jenga box is common in houses.
In some houses the blocks are arranged into towers.
When a tower is present, there is a box nearby.
No two towers are exactly alike.
Towers always contain 54 blocks.
“Jenga” is written on the side of each block.
All blocks have the same dimensions.
There are more open spaces in the bottom half of the towers than in the top half.
The towers have varying degrees of stability. 
They record family histories. Blocks are moved in response to important family events – births, deaths, marriages.
They are religious icons. The positioning of blocks corresponds to the completion of religious rituals.
They are seismometers. Geologists use them to identify the epicenters of earthquakes.
They are indicators of social status. The positions of the blocks represent the family's perception of its place in broader society.
They are a product of an architectural competition. Families were competing to win a contract for a new building. 
Houses with larger families (as indicated by number of beds, range of clothing sizes, etc.) should have more complex towers.
The community should have one or more common meeting places where a replica of the tower is present.
Houses with collapsed towers should be in the same vicinity.
There should be a correlation between the apparent wealth of a family (as judged by the quality and number of possessions) and the complexity of the tower.
There should be public advertisements for the Jenga competition. 
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