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Table 3.

Reviewing discussion.

ConceptStrategyRationale
Supporting Communication Use a chart on the chalkboard, overhead, or dry-erase board.
Use student drawings.
Have a student lead the discussion by creating a chart on the board.
Have each student write their individual ideas on the board. 
Keeping track of student responses with a public document encourages listening and reflection. 
Follow-up Questions How does X compare with Y?
How can/does this relate to the question driving the lesson/unit?
How do you know? What evidence supports this idea?
What does it mean to say_____________?
Why doesn't our old model work to explain this new phenomenon?
How does this fit into the whole picture of what we have learned?
What new questions do you have? 
Follow-up questions help push the students’ understanding; they are meant to help them consider deeply why they think they know something. Such questions connect to the public document and the driving question. 
Student Interactions Student-centered:
Encourage STUDENT discussion and initiation of questions and follow-up questions. Try to GUIDE the discussion rather than lead the discussion
Addressing other students:
Encourage students to address each other and ask each other questions.
Ask students to consider a previous response while formulating their own. 
It is important for students to learn how to communicate in science (vocabulary and behaviors). 
ConceptStrategyRationale
Supporting Communication Use a chart on the chalkboard, overhead, or dry-erase board.
Use student drawings.
Have a student lead the discussion by creating a chart on the board.
Have each student write their individual ideas on the board. 
Keeping track of student responses with a public document encourages listening and reflection. 
Follow-up Questions How does X compare with Y?
How can/does this relate to the question driving the lesson/unit?
How do you know? What evidence supports this idea?
What does it mean to say_____________?
Why doesn't our old model work to explain this new phenomenon?
How does this fit into the whole picture of what we have learned?
What new questions do you have? 
Follow-up questions help push the students’ understanding; they are meant to help them consider deeply why they think they know something. Such questions connect to the public document and the driving question. 
Student Interactions Student-centered:
Encourage STUDENT discussion and initiation of questions and follow-up questions. Try to GUIDE the discussion rather than lead the discussion
Addressing other students:
Encourage students to address each other and ask each other questions.
Ask students to consider a previous response while formulating their own. 
It is important for students to learn how to communicate in science (vocabulary and behaviors). 
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