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Table 2.

Problem-solving discussions.

ConceptStrategiesRationale
Make a Public Document Use a chart on the chalkboard, overhead, or dry-erase board.
Use student drawings.
Have a student lead the discussion by creating a chart on the board.
Have each student write their individual ideas on the board. 
Keeping track of student responses with a public document encourages listening and reflection. 
Use of Evidence What evidence do students use to explain their answers?
What do we know so far?
What do we want to formulate from what we know?
Predictions: What would happen if ______________ changed? 
Helps students make their knowledge known to the class and themselves (can use the activity, the readings, or other resources). 
Follow-up Questions How does X compare with Y?
How can/does this relate to the question driving the lesson/unit?
How do you know? What evidence supports this idea?
What does it mean to say____________________?
Why doesn't our old model work to explain this new phenomenon?
How does this fit into the whole picture of what we have learned?
What new questions do you have? 
Follow-up questions help push the students’ understanding; they are meant to help them consider deeply why they think they know something. Such questions connect to the public document and the driving question. 
ConceptStrategiesRationale
Make a Public Document Use a chart on the chalkboard, overhead, or dry-erase board.
Use student drawings.
Have a student lead the discussion by creating a chart on the board.
Have each student write their individual ideas on the board. 
Keeping track of student responses with a public document encourages listening and reflection. 
Use of Evidence What evidence do students use to explain their answers?
What do we know so far?
What do we want to formulate from what we know?
Predictions: What would happen if ______________ changed? 
Helps students make their knowledge known to the class and themselves (can use the activity, the readings, or other resources). 
Follow-up Questions How does X compare with Y?
How can/does this relate to the question driving the lesson/unit?
How do you know? What evidence supports this idea?
What does it mean to say____________________?
Why doesn't our old model work to explain this new phenomenon?
How does this fit into the whole picture of what we have learned?
What new questions do you have? 
Follow-up questions help push the students’ understanding; they are meant to help them consider deeply why they think they know something. Such questions connect to the public document and the driving question. 
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