Table 1.
Characteristics of the sea-ice (sackhole) brine samples used for choline experiments
Location, YearSampling dayIce thickness (cm)Snow depth (cm)Air temperaturea (°C)Ice temperatureb (°C)Brine salinity (ppt)Bacterial abundancec (mean ± S.D. × 105 mL−1)
Kanajorsuit Bay, 2013 02 April 49 −2.0 −1.2 to −3.2 50 1.76 ± 0.25 
Kobbefjord, 2014 13 March 49 22 −7.0 −1.3 to −1.5d 62.5 2.93 ± 0.11 
18 March 53 30 -6.5 −2.2 to −3.1 54 2.20 ± 0.22 
21 March 58 26 -10 −2.2 to −4.2d 51 2.53 ± 0.01 
21 Marche 58 0e −10 −3.7 to −5.7 73 2.63 ± 0.00 
Location, YearSampling dayIce thickness (cm)Snow depth (cm)Air temperaturea (°C)Ice temperatureb (°C)Brine salinity (ppt)Bacterial abundancec (mean ± S.D. × 105 mL−1)
Kanajorsuit Bay, 2013 02 April 49 −2.0 −1.2 to −3.2 50 1.76 ± 0.25 
Kobbefjord, 2014 13 March 49 22 −7.0 −1.3 to −1.5d 62.5 2.93 ± 0.11 
18 March 53 30 -6.5 −2.2 to −3.1 54 2.20 ± 0.22 
21 March 58 26 -10 −2.2 to −4.2d 51 2.53 ± 0.01 
21 Marche 58 0e −10 −3.7 to −5.7 73 2.63 ± 0.00 

aRecorded at time of sackhole drilling

bRange of temperatures recorded for the upper sections of the “physical” ice core corresponding with the potential brine drainage zone

cMean of duplicate samples

dThese ice temperatures appear anomalously warm relative to sackhole brine salinity as the ice cores were collected later in the day (after sackhole drilling) when air temperature was −3.5°C on 18 March and −7.3°C on 21 March.

eThis site had been cleared of snow 3 days prior (note highest brine salinity in the absence of an insulating snow cover), although wind had created snow drifts (10–35 cm) on a portion of the drilling site.

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