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Table 1.

Source material and data descriptions describing projected responses of marine fauna to climate change, which have potential indirect influence on macrobenthic species (Figure 5). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/elementa.2020.00173.t1

Figure PanelData Description and SourceSource Reference
Projected change in the habitat centroid of 686 benthic species on the North American Shelf, represented as a distance from baseline (kilometer), based on representative concentration pathway (RCP) 8.5 climate projections and habitat suitability models; data pruned to those projections considered to have “high” certainty; data available at doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0196127 Morley et al. (2018)  
Shifting phenology of Calanus finmarchicus, represented as the range of projected change in diapause duration (%) in the North Atlantic based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) RCP 8.5 scenario averaged between 2000–2009 and 2090–2099; data digitized from Figure 3 in Wilson et al. (2016) for 5 discrete regions Wilson et al. (2016)  
Change in distributional centroid, represented as a rate of change in depth (meter) per decade, for 30 fish and invertebrate species captured in the North Sea; rates associated with temperature change; data digitized from Figure 2 in Dulvy et al. (2008)  Dulvy et al. (2008)  
Change in productivity depicted through a relative (%) decline in biomass, amplified at the highest trophic levels assessed at a global scale using six marine ecosystem models (MEMs) and Fisheries and Marine Intercomparison Project; changes aggregated by trophic groups under RCP 8.5 using earth system models and global marine ecosystem models; data digitized from Figure 3 in Lotze et al. (2019). MEMs were limited to animals exceeding 10 cm in length and do not directly estimate changes in macrobenthos Lotze et al. (2019)  
Changes in species richness based on species distributional models aggregated to exclusive economic zones globally; projected changes in richness relative to historical baseline based on IPCC RCP 8.5 climate projections for the year 2100; data available at doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2769 García Molinos et al. (2015)  
Median change (%) in maximum body mass of demersal marine fish aggregated to global ocean basins; change based on ensemble geometric mean difference among species within each ocean basin over 50 year period (2000–2050); climate projections based on IPCC-class ESMs: (1) NOAAs GFDL ESM 2.1 and (2) IPSL-CM4-LOOP SRES A2 scenario; data extrapolated from Figure 3 in Cheung et al. (2012)  Cheung, Pinnegar, et al., (2012)  
Figure PanelData Description and SourceSource Reference
Projected change in the habitat centroid of 686 benthic species on the North American Shelf, represented as a distance from baseline (kilometer), based on representative concentration pathway (RCP) 8.5 climate projections and habitat suitability models; data pruned to those projections considered to have “high” certainty; data available at doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0196127 Morley et al. (2018)  
Shifting phenology of Calanus finmarchicus, represented as the range of projected change in diapause duration (%) in the North Atlantic based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) RCP 8.5 scenario averaged between 2000–2009 and 2090–2099; data digitized from Figure 3 in Wilson et al. (2016) for 5 discrete regions Wilson et al. (2016)  
Change in distributional centroid, represented as a rate of change in depth (meter) per decade, for 30 fish and invertebrate species captured in the North Sea; rates associated with temperature change; data digitized from Figure 2 in Dulvy et al. (2008)  Dulvy et al. (2008)  
Change in productivity depicted through a relative (%) decline in biomass, amplified at the highest trophic levels assessed at a global scale using six marine ecosystem models (MEMs) and Fisheries and Marine Intercomparison Project; changes aggregated by trophic groups under RCP 8.5 using earth system models and global marine ecosystem models; data digitized from Figure 3 in Lotze et al. (2019). MEMs were limited to animals exceeding 10 cm in length and do not directly estimate changes in macrobenthos Lotze et al. (2019)  
Changes in species richness based on species distributional models aggregated to exclusive economic zones globally; projected changes in richness relative to historical baseline based on IPCC RCP 8.5 climate projections for the year 2100; data available at doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2769 García Molinos et al. (2015)  
Median change (%) in maximum body mass of demersal marine fish aggregated to global ocean basins; change based on ensemble geometric mean difference among species within each ocean basin over 50 year period (2000–2050); climate projections based on IPCC-class ESMs: (1) NOAAs GFDL ESM 2.1 and (2) IPSL-CM4-LOOP SRES A2 scenario; data extrapolated from Figure 3 in Cheung et al. (2012)  Cheung, Pinnegar, et al., (2012)  
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