Hearing Southeast Asia: Sounds of Hierarchy and Power in Context is a 12-chapter collection edited by Nathan Porath that explores the relationship between sound and power in Southeast Asia. The book’s lengthy introduction, comprising 86 of the volume’s 352 pages, is followed by 11 additional chapters, seven of which focus on the Malay world (and three of these on Indonesia). The book also includes two chapters devoted to Myanmar, one to the Philippines, and another to Thailand. Methodologically, a majority of the work in this volume is ethnographic, although much of the opening chapter and Martin Platt’s chapter on Thailand involve detailed linguistic analyses. The volume has much to offer and will be of interest to scholars in the growing field of socio-culturally focused sound studies and related fields, as well as anyone interested in hierarchy and power in...

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