[Footnotes]

[Footnotes]
1
New Standard Dictionary of the English Language (Funk and Wagnalls)
A. C. Coolidge defined the world powers in 1908 as "powers which are directly interested in all parts of the world and whose voices must be listened to everywhere." The United States as a World Power (New York, 1908), 7
Coolidge
powers which are directly interested in all parts of the world and whose voices must be listened to everywhere
7
The United States as a World Power
1908
2
J. D. Richardson, comp., Messages and Papers of the Presidents (Washington, 1896), I, 238
Richardson
238
I
Messages and Papers of the Presidents
1896
4
Charles A. and Mary R. Beard, History of the United States (New York, 1921), 477
Charles
477
History of the United States
1921
March, 1775, "to the settlement at Versailles in 1919
5
C. F. Adams, ed., The Works of John Adams (Boston, 1852), VII, 226-227
Adams
226
VII
The Works of John Adams
1852
July 13, 1780
6
Carl Schurz, American Imperialism (n.p., 1899), 28.
Schurz
28
American Imperialism
1899
7
WV. J. Bryan, ed., Speeches of William Jennings Bryan (New York, 1909), II, 14.
Bryan
14
II
Speeches of William Jennings Bryan
1909
8
A. B. Hart, The Foundations of Ameri- can Foreign Policy (New York, 1901)
Hart
The Foundations of American Foreign Policy
1901
9
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, XXVI (1905), 6
6
XXVI
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
1905
10
"The Foremost Nation of the World," American Historical Register, III (1895), 65-70
65
III
American Historical Register
1895
11
James Bryce, Studies in History and Jurisprudence (Oxford, 1901), I, 395
Bryce
395
I
Studies in History and Jurisprudence
1901
12
Abraham Lincoln in 1838
R. P. Basler, ed., The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln (New Brunswick, 1953), I, 109
Basler
109
I
The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln
1953
14
Walter Lippmann, U. S. Foreign Policy: Shield of the Republic (Boston, 1943), 16-22
Lippmann
16
U. S. Foreign Policy: Shield of the Republic
1943
C. F. Adams, ed., Memoirs of John Quincy Adams (Philadelphia, 1875), VI, 179
Adams
179
VI
Memoirs of John Quincy Adams
1875
15
Theodore Roosevelt's remarkable letter of November 30, 1918, in E. E. Morison, ed., The Letters of Theodore Roosevelt (Cambridge, 1954), VIII, 1407- 1409
Roosevelt
1407
VIII
The Letters of Theodore Roosevelt
1954
Manchester Guardian Weekly recently stated that "American security was, in fact, a by-product of the strength of the British fleet." LXXXII, 10 (June 30, 1960)
Manchester
June 30
10
LXXXII
Guardian Weekly
1960
17
Scots Magazine, LXXVII (1815), 63
63
LXXVII
Scots Magazine
1815
Edinburgh Review, XXIV (1814), 262
Edinburgh
262
XXIV
Review
1814
ibid., LXXXVI (1847), 395-396
395
LXXXVI
Review
1847
Richard S. Cramer, "British Magazines and the United States, 1815-1848" (unpublished doctoral dissertation, Stanford University)
Hart, Foundations of American Foreign Policy, 12
Hart
12
Foundations of American Foreign Policy
18
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine thus described the United States: "The dominant power of the New World, and with three thousand miles of sea separating it from the great military states of Europe, the Union has found on its own continent no power which unaided can check its aggressions, and as yet no European state but Great Britain has had either an interest or the power to enter the lists against it." LXXX (1856), 116-117.
116
LXXX
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine
1856
19
Holy Alliance in 1819
21
Public Opinion XXIV, 580 (May 12, 1898)
May 12
580
XXIV
Public Opinion
1898
ibid., 615 (May 19, 1898)
May 19
615
Public Opinion
1898
Westmin- ster Review, CL (1898), 168
168
CL
Westminster Review
1898
Nineteenth Century, XLIV (1898), 194
194
XLIV
Nineteenth Century
1898
"Unless all signs deceive, the American Republic breaks from her old moorings, and sails out to be a 'world power'." Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, CLXIII (1898), 703
703
CLXIII
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine
1898
22
Cortelyou's Diary, Aug. 17, 1899
Cortelyou
Aug. 17
Diary
1899
Margaret Leech, In the Days of McKinley, (New York, 1959), 464
Leech
464
Days of McKinley
1959
23
North American Review, CLXXII (1901), 177-190.
177
CLXXII
North American Review
1901
25
François Barbé-Marbois, The History of Louisiana (Philadelphia, 1830), 310-311
Barbé-Marbois
310
The History of Louisiana
1830
26
American Historical Review, XVIII (1913), 513-521
513
XVIII
American Historical Review
1913
"more nearly on the level of Algiers" (p. 514)
27
Henry David Thoreau, Walden (Mt. Vernon, N. Y., [1956]), 317
Thoreau
317
Walden
1956
The Western World, or, Travels in the United States in 1846-1847 (London, 1849), II, 284
284
II
The Western World, or, Travels in the United States in 1846-1847
1849
C. P. Hodgson, A Residence at Nagasaki and Hakodate in 1859-1860 (London, 1861), 308
Hodgson
308
A Residence at Nagasaki and Hakodate in 1859-1860
1861
28
John S. Galbraith, "France as a Factor in the Oregon Negotiations," Pacific Northwest Quarterly, XLIV (1953), 69-73
Galbraith
69
XLIV
Pacific Northwest Quarterly
1953
29
Spectator (March 16, 1861)
March 16
Spectator
1861
"be entitled to rank as a first-class power." XXXIV, 273
273
XXXIV
Be Entitled To Rank As A First-Class Power
American Historical Re- view, II (1897), 318
318
II
American Historical Review
1897
Spectator declared in February, 1866
February
Spectator
1866
"Nobody doubts any more that the Union is a power of the first class, a nation which it is very dangerous to offend and almost impossible to attack." XXXIX, 177
177
XXXIX
Nobody doubts any more that the Union is a power of the first class, a nation which it is very dangerous to offend and almost impossible to attack
Ibid., XLII, 250
250
XLII
Nobody doubts any more that the Union is a power of the first class, a nation which it is very dangerous to offend and almost impossible to attack
Germany and the Next War (trans. by A. H. Powles, London, 1914), 94
94
Germany and the Next War
1914
31
Atlantic Monthly of May, 1898
May
Atlantic Monthly
1898
"The United States is certainly now entitled to rank among the great Powers of the world." LXXXI, 578
578
LXXXI
The United States is certainly now entitled to rank among the great Powers of the world
32
"A Power of the first rank." XLVIII (1879), 226
226
XLVIII
A Power of the first rank
1879
"all other great Powers." Ibid., LVII (1884), 333
333
LVII
A Power of the first rank
1884
Nineteenth Century, XXI (1887), 799
799
XXI
Nineteenth Century
1887
Spectator, LXVII (1889), 532
532
LXVII
Spectator
1889
Westminster Review, CXXXI (1889), 508
508
CXXXI
Westminster Review
1889
Public Opinion, VII, 229 (June 22, 1889)
June 22
229
VII
Public Opinion
1889
Nineteenth Century, XXXIX (1896), 906-913
906
XXXIX
Nineteenth Century
1896
33
Dial, XLVI (1909), 44
44
XLVI
Dial
1909
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