The past two decades have witnessed a flourishing of studies dedicated to the analysis of the Korean War. Michael J. Devine adds to this corpus with his work, The Korean War Remembered: Contested Memories of an Unended Conflict. Devine, a lifetime public historian and scholar, offers a panoramic account of the vicissitudes of public memory within the United States, China, and the two Koreas. At the heart of the analysis is a concern with the evolution of the public memory of the war, principally within the United States, and the ways in which the “evolving and conflicted memory of the Korean War…can only be understood and appreciated in a broad international contest” (p. 1). Communicated through lucid prose and covering a wide range of subjects, the work offers one of the few synthetic treatments of the contested memorialization of this unresolved and so-called “forgotten” conflict.

After an introductory chapter...

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