Adela Sloss-Vento, feminist, writer, critic, and political activist was a key figure in the Mexican American civil rights movement as well as a minor figure in the Chicano movement. Her story reminds us that, though often invisible in the histories of Texas and the United States, Mexican American women fought valiantly for civil rights throughout the twentieth century. Sloss-Vento’s activism is situated within the era of Jim Crow/Juan Crow segregation, overtly practiced in South Texas where she resided. It is in this historical context that Cynthia Orozco skillfully introduces us to the public intellectual, feminist, and paradox that was Adela Sloss-Vento.

Sloss-Vento worked closely with Alonso S. Perales, the principal founder of LULAC (League of United Latin American Citizens) between 1927 and 1960 and was dedicated to preserving his legacy. However, she herself never became a member of LULAC, which refused women until the early 1930s with the formation of...

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