Borders of Violence and Justice examines the historical relationship between people of Mexican origins and law enforcement in the U.S. Southwest in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Utilizing an array of court cases, newspapers, and regional archives from U.S. border states, Behnken offers an examination of the various ways Mexican-origin people contended with violence and injustice at the hands of those who purported to represent the law. While the book does not shy away from considerations of police and mob violence against ethnic Mexicans in the United States, it is notable for its examination of Mexican Americans who entered into law enforcement as an “early civil rights strategy” (p. 9).

The book is divided into six chapters that move chronologically and thematically across the U.S. side of the Mexican border. Chapters 1 and 2 consider criminal justice in the aftermath of the U.S.-Mexico War and demonstrate that new states...

You do not currently have access to this content.