Uneven development marks some people and territories for toxic futures and premature death, while privileging others. Often this dynamic is filtered through a gendered and racialized lens, with communities of color marked as communities for extraction, vulnerable to environmental hazards and threats. Environmental justice studies and organizations have responded with action and investigation. Racial Ecologies, edited by Leilani Nishime and Kim D. Hester Williams, furthers the study of and action in environmental justice with an edited collection that is filled with moments of resistance, study, and hope. From an ethnic studies framework, the editors intersect an environmental focus with race, Indigenous studies, and postcolonialism, and present a variety of methodological approaches. The volume’s chapters work to dismantle large structures and build anew through analyzing moments of slow and outright violence by state and corporate entities....

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