In Global Christianity and the Black Atlantic: Tuskegee, Colonialism, and the Shaping of African Industrial Education, Andrew E. Barnes provides significant insight into how African Christians challenged European domination through use of a strategy of social development via Christianization, appropriated from their understanding of African American Christian life (1). Central to Barnes’s study is how African Christians strategically built upon the establishment of schools like Booker T. Washington’s Tuskegee Institute. Contributing to the fields of History, American Studies, and Religious Studies, Barnes reveals how African-edited newspapers became primary sources through which African Christians learned about African American life as well as African American contributions to industrialism.

Examining an underanalyzed range of African-edited newspaper archives, Barnes explores how, in both West Africa and South Africa, African-edited newspapers played an essential role in movements for the establishment...

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