Since Trayvon Martin was murdered by citizen-vigilante George Zimmerman in February 2012, young Black Americans around the country and comrades in countries around the world have been rallying and organizing for Black liberation in the United States. Such fights, often led by young queer Black women, are rarely destined to be archived in the annals of history—the stories, lives, and experiences of young Black Americans and African-descendant people are frequently erased or co-opted by those with more power, access, and privilege. In Unapologetic: A Black, Queer, and Feminist Mandate for Radical Movements, Charlene Carruthers, the founding national director of Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100), a membership-based activist organization of young Black Americans ages 18 to 35, writes against that current by centering the accounts and choices of young Black Americans during the early moments of...

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