This edited volume surveys a variety of the most prominent Sufi movements active in North America, with its authors using a variety of ethnographic, textual, and historical methods. It provides analytical details that complicate stereotypic notions of Sufism in America as simply Islamic spirituality detached from Islamic shari‘a or as universalistic spirituality with a superficial veneer of Islam. At the same time, it reveals a range of postures towards Islamic law, Sufi traditionalism, and Sufi teacher-disciple genealogies, both between American Sufi orders and within single orders. Through detailed case studies, written by individual specialists on each Sufi order, this work expands what is meant by “Islam” or “Sufi” when expressed by a majority non-Muslim American demographic.

The book begins with an incisive meta-analysis by Marcia Hermansen of the continuing usefulness, and challenges, of her three categories of “perennials” (universalistic), “hybrids” (Islam-Sufism adapted), and “transplants” (Muslim immigrants’ perpetuation of their Sufi...

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