Christopher Cotter’s text is an admirable contribution to the growing study of non-religion in its various forms. He explores how non-religion as an identification claim works to situate individuals within a complex network of social powers, placing claimants in relation to one another and the structures collectively produced and maintained. Scholars already versed in this subfield may find it valuable to work through the material. The book is dense and difficult, however, and unlikely to be helpful for general usage, either in research or the classroom. This reader often felt bogged down by copious references and citations, which read as survivals from earlier iterations of the content, particularly reflective of a dissertation level of literature engagement; indeed both Cotter’s dissertation and master’s thesis work have been rolled into this monograph.

The first half of the book is largely theoretical. Chapter 1 introduces the broad landscape of the field, situating the...

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