Social scientists have examined the reasons for individual religious mobility from a variety of angles—betrayal by leaders, dissatisfaction with services, internal dissension, multigenerational tensions, changing demographics, and many others. There also might be cultural as well as personal factors at play, or so argue Yonatan Gez, Yvan Droz, Jeanne Rey, and Edio Soares in Butinage: The Art of Religious Mobility. Their book offers a comparative study of religious mobility through targeted in-depth interviews conducted in Brazil, Kenya, Ghana, and Switzerland from the perspectives of those who practice it. In this way the authors add much to our understanding of what motivates individual religious change. The argument is direct yet multilayered and expansive: “Religious identity often extends far beyond exclusive institutional ideal-type members and generates fluid, circumstantial, and somewhat personalized religious identities” (11). By asserting that religious practitioners are “fundamentally mobile,” they imply that religious mobility is the given, not...

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