Within the field of religious studies, the phenomenology of religion has been shunned at times in favor of more quantitative and social scientific approaches. Preferring to interrogate the claims of religious proponents rather than defining qualities of inner states and feelings, these scientifically-oriented methods suppose the latter are simply unobtainable or unobservable and therefore evade objective description. But this technique has proved incomplete. There is nothing to dispute necessarily about these approaches, it’s just that there could be more to meet the eye.

Affective Trajectories: Religion and Emotion in African Cityscapes provides just this, namely ethnographic research combining rich description with visual representations, i.e., occasional photographs. Furthermore, this volume acknowledges that there are limitations to the phenomenology of religion and that it “lacks analysis of the ways in which religion is implied in the production of sociospatial relations” (32). As a collection, it seeks to overcome this limitation by providing...

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