In Apocalyptic Geographies, Jerome Tharaud carefully navigates nineteenth-century U.S. evangelical notions of the apocalypse and how they impacted American society. Tharaud uses various media—sermons, newspapers, religious and political pamphlets, and art—to establish what many evangelicals viewed as biblical promises of the return of Christ and how those promises were tied to physical and metaphorical landscapes, specifically in what is now the United States. Tharaud defines apocalyptic geographies as “use of represented space…to visualize Christian sacred history—the vast arc of God’s plot of redemption from the Creation to the Last Judgment narrated in the Bible—and ultimately to make moral claims” (2). He adds that a “practitioner of apocalyptic geographies [is] one who uses the landscape to reveal the nature of ultimate reality and the unfolding of sacred history,” which he asserts was not necessarily only for those with religious intentions (2).

Tharaud uses religious media and geographic landscapes to “rethink...

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