For at least twenty years now, sociologists of religion have been observing the growing routinization and societal integration of modern Pagan communities, at least in the United States. We can now find Pagans serving as prison chaplains, sitting on interfaith councils, and establishing institutions like the Cherry Hill Seminary in South Carolina. It is, in fact, the executive director of this seminary, Holli S. Emore, who has written this short book, in which she sets forward recommendations for those modern Pagans seeking to minister to their religious community. Rather than outlining methods of potential Pagan proselytization, which is often discouraged in modern Pagan circles, Emore notes that her book is aimed at those “with a genuine desire to support Pagan spiritual needs” (2).

Emore notes that ministering to modern Pagans poses challenges that those catering to larger or better-established religious communities are less likely to face. The majority of modern...

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