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wagnerism

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Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2017) 41 (1): 31–47.
Published: 01 July 2017
...Clinton D. Young This article examines the development of Wagnerism in late-nineteenth-century Spain, focusing on how it became an integral part of Catalan nationalism. The reception of Wagner's music and ideas in Spain was determined by the country's uneven economic development and the weakness of...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2003) 26 (3): 278–285.
Published: 01 March 2003
... Huebner. French Opera at the Fin de Siècle: Wagnerism, Nationalism, and Style. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. xvii, 526 pp. Richard Wagner still casts his powerful shadow. These two stimulating books on French opera of the mid- and late nineteenth century both signiŽ cant contributions to our...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2017) 41 (1): 3–30.
Published: 01 July 2017
... premiere for an opera by Wagner in 1869—given that there would be almost nothing for two decades after 1870—is remarkable in itself. The 1860s furthermore saw the emergence of a coherent voice of Wagnérisme , the presence of French Wagnéristes at the composer's premieres all over Europe and a developing...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2018) 42 (2): 96–122.
Published: 04 December 2018
... question see, among others, Manuela Schwartz, Wagner-Rezeption und französisiche Oper des Fin de siè- cle: Untersuchungen zu Vincent d Indys Fervaal (Sinzig: Studio Verl. Schewe, 1999); Von Wagner zum Wagnérisme: Musik, Literature, Kunst, Politik, ed. Annegret Fauser and Manuela Schwartz (Leipzig...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2015) 38 (3): 219–242.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Martin Knust Wagner's music, aesthetics, and personality were influenced profoundly by the declamation and recitation techniques of his time. “Declamation” as an optic-acoustic phenomenon embraces in this context both the actor's artificial speech and physical delivery. The theatrical declamation...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2016) 39 (3): 272–289.
Published: 01 March 2016
...Adrian Daub This article examines the musical, literary, and theatrical practice of a group of early German modernists — above all Richard Strauss and Frank Wedekind. All of them turn to dance, its unmediated physicality, and its erotic charge to articulate a response to Richard Wagner's theatrical...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2009) 33 (1): 25–61.
Published: 01 July 2009
...Katherine Kolb This article analyzes the writings of Berlioz on Wagner and, to a lesser extent, of Wagner on Berlioz, emphasizing the covert innuendoes of their verbal sparring during the period surrounding the Tannhääuser debacle at the Paris Opééra (1860) and Berlioz's tribulations with Les...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2001) 25 (2-3): 190–211.
Published: 01 November 2001
...Lawrence Kramer The first descriptive progam for the Prelude to Richard Wagner's Romantic opera Lohengrin was written, not by Wagner himself, but by Franz Liszt, shortly after Liszt conducted the premiere of the opera in the summer of 1850. Thus began a complex reception history that raises key...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2014) 37 (3): 161–187.
Published: 01 March 2014
...Laurie McManus Histories of progressive musical politics in mid-nineteenth-century Germany often center on the writings of Richard Wagner and Franz Brendel, relegating contributors such as the feminist and author Louise Otto (1819–95) to the periphery. However, Otto's lifelong engagement with...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2013) 37 (1): 56–88.
Published: 01 July 2013
... of Wagner and French literature, Léon Guichard was also skeptical of genuine connections between Dujardin s novel and Wagner s music. See Léon Guichard, La Musique et les lettres en France au temps du wagnérisme (Paris: Presses universitaires de France, 1963), 217 20. 10Anthony Suter, intro. to...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2013) 37 (1): 56–88.
Published: 01 July 2013
... of Wagner and French literature, Léon Guichard was also skeptical of genuine connections between Dujardin s novel and Wagner s music. See Léon Guichard, La Musique et les lettres en France au temps du wagnérisme (Paris: Presses universitaires de France, 1963), 217 20. 10Anthony Suter, intro. to...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2019) 42 (3): 225–248.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Laurie McManus Unlike Wagner, Mahler, or Schoenberg, Johannes Brahms is often absent from discussions of Viennese fin-de-siècle psychological theories and their intersections with musical culture. The privileged context depicting an aging Brahms resistant to new trends in politics and the arts...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2015) 38 (3): 272–301.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Marc Brooks The obvious debt that Strauss's operas owe to Wagner often led early critics to view their conspicuous lack of spiritual depth as an unintentional failure. Recent commentators such as Charles Youmans, Leon Botstein, and Michael Walter have rightly characterized this feature as a...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2005) 29 (2): 161–184.
Published: 01 November 2005
...William Kinderman The Prelude to the third act of Parsifal is one of Wagner's most advanced essays in expanded tonality. One author has described it as "set[ting] foot in atonal territory as it re-explores the melancholy, disjointed polytonal idiom of the introduction to the third act of Tristan...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2009) 32 (3): 211–234.
Published: 01 March 2009
...J. P. E. Harper-Scott Wagner's engagement with medieval sources like the Nibelungenlied has generally been examined in relation to poetic style in his librettos. One of the defining structural features of his literary inspirations is the narrative interlace structure, which is common to literature...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2015) 38 (3): 193–218.
Published: 01 March 2015
... the Elder. Although he is rarely considered alongside the virtuosi of his age, his playing seems to have had more than a touch of Mephistophelean power, according to the young Richard Wagner: I shall never forget the enthusiasm, bordering on derangement, generated in that extraordinary figure Johann...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2010) 33 (3): 232–246.
Published: 01 March 2010
... impact of Fétis s writings on Wagner reception in France during the 1850s, see Katharine Ellis, Wagner and Anti-Wagnerism in the Paris Periodical Press, 1852 1870, in Von Wagner zum Wagnérisme: Musik, Literatur, Kunst, Politik, ed. Annegret Fauser and Manuela Schwartz (Leipzig: Leipziger...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2014) 38 (1): 53–78.
Published: 01 July 2014
... of regeneration was Richard Wagner s appropriation of Gobineau s theory of racial degeneration. See Werner Conze, Rasse, in Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe: Historisches Lexikon zur politisch-sozialen Sprache in Deutschland, vol. 5, ed. Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck (Stuttgart...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2009) 33 (2): 151–172.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Stephen C. Meyer ““Aura””——configured as an interplay of preservation and loss or——to quote the first version of Walter Benjamin's famous artwork essay——as an ““interweaving of space and time””——is central not only to sound recording, but also to the musical dramaturgy of Wagner's final work. This...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music (2005) 29 (2): 142–160.
Published: 01 November 2005
...Raymond Knapp In Wagner's Tristan und Isolde, the title characters conceive their union as a direct linkage between self and world, a linkage that involves a crucial short circuit, bypassing societal conventions and institutions, and echoing the nineteenth-century Germanic disdain for "Civilization...
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