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Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2013; 363231–247 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2013.36.3.231
Published: 01 March 2013
...: Liszt's national identity. Writers have come down on all sides, declaring Liszt was “really” Hungarian, French, German, or “cosmopolitan,” yet the role of language in projecting these identities has so far been overlooked. This article maps Liszt's fluctuating proficiency and frequency of use of a variety...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2012; 362136–145 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2012.36.2.136
Published: 01 November 2012
...: Modern Library, 1993), V, 340, 342. Subsequent references appear in the text. The Language of an Unknown Country: Intratextuality in Proust s In Search of Lost Time And it was precisely when [Vinteuil] was striving with all his might to create something new that one recognised, beneath the apparent...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2020; 433194–208 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2020.43.3.194
Published: 01 March 2020
... imagined. To say rhetoric of seduction is to discuss the language of the body a textualized, mate- rial body, a body that speaks itself into existence, a body that penetrates its listening objects with its voice. It is my intention, by focusing on femmes fatales episodes of seduction, to reeval- uate...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2020; 433143–169 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2020.43.3.143
Published: 01 March 2020
... established by the musicologist Ludwig Nohl, whose writings imagined Beethoven s final com- positions as tangible traces of his person, his dying voice. This form of listening was not new, as Mark Evan Bonds has shown.14 It was a popular offshoot of a longstanding conversation about music and language that...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2020; 433170–193 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2020.43.3.170
Published: 01 March 2020
... from a certain reading of poststructuralism that all language, and thus all narration, is indeterminate and therefore unreliable, including yours and mine in ordinary speech. But this position further suggests that the possibilities for new approaches to theunreliable narrative are unlimited, and that...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2015; 392142–166 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2015.39.2.142
Published: 01 November 2015
... everything suddenly changed.” In fact, the telegraph anticipated several key premises of recording by decades. Its language is heard, on the one hand, in the direct imitation of Strauss Jr.'s Telegraphische Depeschen, and on the other, in François Sudre's development of a “universal musical language” to...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 43299–120 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.43.2.99
Published: 01 November 2019
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 43267–85 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.43.2.67
Published: 01 November 2019
... theRomance languages regardingmadness changed significantly. Thoughmanie is found in French dictionaries as early as 1606 (glossed as Fureur, Mania, Furor El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha (whose parts first appeared in 1605 and 1615) described himself as loco; the termmania never appears in the...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 432121–139 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.43.2.121
Published: 01 November 2019
... language of the gods. 16 This language could not be acquired by studying its lexical elements, which the young violinists were assumed to have understood by then, but by surmounting technical difficulties. Two violin manuals from the 1830s set a new standard, now addressing individual teach- ing for a...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 4313–16 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.43.1.3
Published: 01 July 2019
... the highest aesthetic level, a phe- nomenon Margaret Notley has called the cult of the Classical Adagio in chamber music. For example, she quotes Hector Berlioz, writing in 1862 of Beethoven s adagios, in language that resonates with that of Mosewius and Heuss on Aus Liebe : There are no human...
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Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 43117–37 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.43.1.17
Published: 01 July 2019
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 43138–60 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.43.1.38
Published: 01 July 2019
... irait pas, je ne puis m en charger. Vous ne tirerez, je le crains aucun parti de cette musique; quant à la pièce, je suis de votre avis [emphasis original Presumably, much of the assign- ments regarding tone worked on verbal arrangements or even general tacit understanding. 45 language in his reviews...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 423157–183 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.42.3.157
Published: 01 April 2019
... appeared start- ing in the 1930s, following on the earlier interna- tional success of the operetta Das Dreimäderlhaus and two subsequent English-language versions, Blossom Time (U.S., 1921) and Lilac Time (England, 1922). In one rather successful film example, director Willi Forst s Leise flehen meine...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 423225–248 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.42.3.225
Published: 01 April 2019
... laugh from the safe shore at the dangers he had avoided.28 In both excerpts, Kalbeck s poetic language obscures any potentially lurid subject material. 27 Das Bild, den unverdorbenen blondhaarigen, blauäugi- gen Jungen und Jüngling der denkbar schlechtesten Gesellschaft aufspielen zu sehen, hat etwas...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2019; 423184–224 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2019.42.3.184
Published: 01 April 2019
... Symphonic Acorns KIRILL ZIKANOV 185 KIRILL ZIKANOV Glinka s Three Models A few weeks later he set off on a journey through Spain, touring much of the country, learning the language, and collecting native tunes in his notebook.2 The first product of these experiences, completed in the fall of 1845, was Jota...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2014; 38130–52 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2014.38.1.030
Published: 01 July 2014
...Don Michael Randel Poetry and music have in common various ways of structuring sound. In both, one can speak of rhythm, meter, loudness (e.g., accent), and pitch. Beyond sound in the narrow sense, one can also speak of syntax in that both language and Western tonal music create expectations that...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2018; 42296–122 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2018.42.2.96
Published: 04 December 2018
..., Tristan de Wagner critiqué par Berlioz, Revue musicale de Suisse romande 49/2 (June-August 1996): 3 25. Verdi, who in milder language recorded his reactions on a copy of Lohengrin after he had attended a performance of the opera in 1871.3 These two documents remain invaluable sources for accessing the...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2018; 422123–154 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2018.42.2.123
Published: 04 December 2018
... Illinois Press, 2015), 12 15, 80, 175 85. 9Feldman, Victorian Modernism, 3. The rest of this para- graph draws upon Feldman s discussion of Ruskin, 20 34. 125 STEPHEN DOWNES Joseph Joachim and the English moving from the details of representation (the language of words) and execution of technique (the...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2018; 42273–95 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2018.42.2.73
Published: 04 December 2018
... pre- suppose scholarly exegesis, implicitly position- ing an enlightened expert (the collector or theo- rist) as the interpretive spokesperson for a seem- ingly unconscious, childlike, or ignorant subject (the singer).27 Lodged in written language, these traces of vocality become proxies for an...
Journal Articles
19th-Century Music. 2015; 3913–34 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/ncm.2015.39.1.3
Published: 01 July 2015
... main characters in the opera) and by the language of tonality. Evaluation of the musical means by which Berlioz psychoanalyzes the characters of a masochist, Héro, and a hysteric, Béatrice, ultimately reveals a surprisingly provocative work of vivid psychological drama. I am grateful to Julian...