In the last two years, we have experienced the contradictory nature of feeling both connected and disconnected at the same time. As we increasingly rely on screen-to-screen interactions, we often forget that connectivity and connectedness has taken different forms in different locations throughout history. In Connected: How a Mexican Village Built Its Own Cell Phone Network, Roberto González analyzes what being connected means for the Zapotec people of Talea, Oaxaca. The title, however, is an understatement, and although González uses the story of Talea GSM—which captured the imagination of Mexican and international news outlets—to connect with the reader, Connected goes well beyond the cellphone network. Looking at roads, migration, cellphones, and social media, González addresses many of the contradictions that have accompanied globalization processes and new technologies. Through the pages of this book, we hear the voices of Taleans speaking both in favor of and against specific technologies and...

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