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near-transfer

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Journal Articles
Music Perception (2011) 29 (2): 147–155.
Published: 01 December 2011
...Kathleen A. Corrigall; Laurel J. Trainor previous research has found that music training in childhood is associated with word decoding, a fundamental reading skill related to the ability to pronounce individual words. These findings have typically been explained by a near transfer mechanism because...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2020) 37 (4): 323–338.
Published: 11 March 2020
... social interaction multisensory facilitation References Alais , D. , & Burr , D. ( 2004 ). The ventriloquist effect results from near-optimal bimodal integration . Current Biology , 14 ( 3 ), 257 – 262 . DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2004.01.029 Banse , R...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2019) 37 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 September 2019
... were fitted with 25 reflective markers, including 3 on the head. Clarinettists’ instruments were also fitted with 4 markers, two near the mouthpiece and two near the bell. Eye gaze data were simultaneously collected using SMI ETC 2 wireless glasses (gaze data are reported in Bishop et al., 2019...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2019) 36 (5): 468–479.
Published: 01 June 2019
..., Flowers and Dunne-Sousa (1990) found that preschoolers consistently used larger vocal ranges in echoing patterns than when singing songs. With first graders, Van Zee (as cited in Nichols, 2016 , p. 41) also concluded that the ability to match tonal patterns does not always transfer to singing the songs...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2018) 35 (5): 579–593.
Published: 01 June 2018
... skills and language skills, strengthening the evidence for a developmental link between these two abilities. © 2018 by The Regents of the University of California 2018 21 6 2017 20 1 2018 music training language transfer vocabulary phonological processing EARLY CHILDHOOD...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2018) 35 (5): 527–539.
Published: 01 June 2018
... these skills will also transfer to perception and intelligibility of noisy Death Metal vocalizations. Three empirical questions were posed in this investi- gation: First, to what extent can listeners understand the lyrical content of Death Metal music? Second, is intel- ligibility of violent Death Metal...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2017) 35 (2): 211–234.
Published: 01 December 2017
... as an indirect way to measure the relation of blends to the input cadences. One intuitive assumption is that an ideal double-scope blend should be equally similar to each of the input cadences (it should resemble both input concepts) and therefore should appear between them (ideally near the...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2017) 35 (2): 127–143.
Published: 01 December 2017
... roughness of unmodulated noise signals, which, despite strong fluctuations, is very low. This is because a noise signal causes fluctuations in the periph- eral ear that are uncorrelated across adjacent critical bands. Therefore, the cross-correlation coefficients are near zero, and decrease the predicted...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2017) 34 (3): 335–351.
Published: 01 February 2017
... earlier run (the average step of the last six reversals) was taken as the initial step for the next run. This adaptive training protocol ensured that trained pitch intervals were adjusted based on partici- pants performance over time. Given the increased dif- ficulty (near-threshold) of the trained pitch...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2016) 34 (2): 132–151.
Published: 01 December 2016
... themind of the musician. Kentner (1976) stated that, . . . there is no such thing as a difficult piece. A piece of music is either impossible, or it is easy. The process, whereby it migrates from one category to the other, is known as practising (p. 90). The transfer (prac- ticing) of information...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2014) 31 (5): 470–484.
Published: 01 June 2014
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2013) 31 (2): 97–117.
Published: 01 December 2013
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2013) 30 (4): 369–390.
Published: 01 April 2013
... 98.1 (range ¼ 93.6-100), the mean hit percentage was 96.5, and the mean false alarm percentage was 0.4. Given such near-ceiling per- formance, any further comparisons between stimulus conditions or probe positions within the SA condition could be expected to yield only small differences, and therefore...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2012) 29 (5): 479–491.
Published: 01 June 2012
...% agreement across different measures). As a group, AD participants scored significantly lower than the controls. However, five AD participants performed impressively, near or above the control mean on most of the tests, including both the two pitch distortion tests. Four other participants showed above...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2011) 29 (1): 23–36.
Published: 01 September 2011
...., fMRI, ERP) Transfer Studies designed to examine the effects of music training on non-musical domains TABLE 3. Participants Domain code Definitions. Code Definition Musicians, 1 5 Includes subjects with music training between 1 and 5 years (average was used when provided) Musicians, 5 10 Includes...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2011) 29 (1): 1–21.
Published: 01 September 2011
... of the field, a tone that probably derived from the myth of the misunder- stood, alienated composer of romantic lore, which easily transferred to music theory: like positivistic musicologists, music theorists felt isolated and disdained by the American Musicological Society (AMS). With so much at...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2011) 28 (5): 473–490.
Published: 01 June 2011
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2010) 28 (2): 205–208.
Published: 01 December 2010
... text in the near term, and it covers the major aspects of the field quite comprehensively. I ve not had the opportunity to use the text myself yet, but certainly will do so in the academic year. The book is divided into four parts of roughly equal size, as discussed below. Chapters 1 4 comprise the...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2009) 26 (5): 451–464.
Published: 01 June 2009
...), though we cannot be certain that this, in effect, scaling factor of 1, transfers to the dancers who are not the producers of the music. Further, there may be another mechanism in opera- tion. If the dancer does not match the serial sequence of dance phrases through omissions of intended move- ments or...
Journal Articles
Music Perception (2009) 26 (4): 303–320.
Published: 01 April 2009
... constant (see Figure 1). The mean horizontal distance between notes provided a visual angle of 1° at a typical viewing dis- tance of 45 cm. Although sequences were variable in length, the beginning of the sequence always appeared near the left edge of the staff, implicitly encouraging participants to use...