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listening-time

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Distributions of ratios of <b>listening</b> <b>time</b> to duration of musical novelty.  ...
Published: 01 December 2018
FIGURE 8. Distributions of ratios of listening time to duration of musical novelty. FIGURE 8. Distributions of ratios of listening time to duration of musical novelty. FIGURE 8. Distributions of ratios of listening time to duration of musical novelty. FIGURE 8. Distributions of ratios of listening time to duration of musical novelty. More
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Distributions of per-trial <b>listening</b> <b>times</b> and per-stimulus average listeni...
Published: 01 December 2018
FIGURE 2. Distributions of per-trial listening times and per-stimulus average listening times for each of the three experiments. The stimulus denoted by the black diamond in Panel F is the initial two minutes of Chameleon by Herbie Hancock. FIGURE 2. Distributions of per-trial listening times FIGURE 2. Distributions of per-trial listening times and per-stimulus average listening times for each of the three experiments. The stimulus denoted by the black diamond in Panel F is the initial two minutes of Chameleon by Herbie Hancock. FIGURE 2. Distributions of per-trial listening times More
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Average <b>listening</b> <b>times</b> in each of the different stimulus categories in  Ex...
Published: 01 December 2018
FIGURE 5. Average listening times in each of the different stimulus categories in Experiments 2 and 3 . Lines with asterisks indicate statistically significant differences, * = p &lt; .05; *** = p &lt; .0001. FIGURE 5. Average listening times in each of the different stimulus categories FIGURE 5. Average listening times in each of the different stimulus categories in Experiments 2 and 3 . Lines with asterisks indicate statistically significant differences, * = p &lt; .05; *** = p &lt; .0001. FIGURE 5. Average listening times in each of the different stimulus categories More
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2018; 362175–200 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2018.36.2.175
Published: 01 December 2018
...FIGURE 8. Distributions of ratios of listening time to duration of musical novelty. FIGURE 8. Distributions of ratios of listening time to duration of musical novelty. ...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 1998; 153265–289 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40285768
Published: 01 April 1998
...Bruno H. Repp In three experiments, musically trained listeners tried to detect local deviations from a typical pattern of expressive timing in the initial measures of Chopin's Etude in E Major. The goal of the experiments was to neutralize structurally based perceptual biases ("timing expectations...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 1996; 142117–159 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40285715
Published: 01 December 1996
.... (1993). Mechanisms of cue extraction in memory for musical time. Contempo- rary Music Review, 9, 191-207. Deliège, I. (1995). The two steps of the categorization process in music listening: An ap- proach of the cue extraction mechanism as modular system. In R. Steinberg (Ed.), Music and the mind...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2020; 374263–277 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.37.4.263
Published: 11 March 2020
... estimation paradigm. Results show that the metrical level participants synchronized with influenced perceived time: actively attending to a higher metrical level (half notes, longer intertap intervals) led to the shortest time estimations, hence time was experienced as passing more quickly. Listening without...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2020; 373196–207 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.37.3.196
Published: 01 February 2020
... the final event occurred in time with the sequence. In half the trials participants listened without moving, and in half they synchronized keystrokes while listening. Pianists and non-pianists were better able to identify the timing of the final tone after synchronizing keystrokes compared to...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2017; 345501–514 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2017.34.5.501
Published: 01 June 2017
... the interaction of variables that produce various emotional outcomes. Data were collected from 195 participants using the MuPsych app: a mobile ESM designed for the real-time and ecologically valid measurement of personal music listening. Multilevel structural equation modelling was utilized to...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2018; 36177–97 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2018.36.1.77
Published: 01 September 2018
... similarity motivic variation Pierre Boulez Notes 1. For participants listening to Anthèmes 1 , each of these five blocks was itself performed three times, using the same stimuli, so that participants completed the same tasks with the stimuli belonging to one motivic family three times in direct...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2018; 355594–606 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2018.35.5.594
Published: 01 June 2018
... with music training listened to tonal melodies and responded to target tones by singing their pitches as quickly as possible. The target tones implied an expected or an unexpected chord; they occurred at expected or unexpected times. The results showed that sing-back reaction times (RTs) were shorter...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2019; 37142–56 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2019.37.1.42
Published: 01 September 2019
... activity registered in electroencephalogram (EEG) signals on a given time instant. Our experiment's results—with 26 volunteers (13 musicians and 13 nonmusicians) who listened the classical music Hungarian Dance No. 5 from Johannes Brahms—have shown that is possible to linearly differentiate musicians and...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2013; 312157–170 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2013.31.2.157
Published: 01 December 2013
... subjective experience at various times throughout participants’ everyday functioning. The aim of the current project was to develop and trial a mobile ESM (m-ESM) capable of collecting event-related data during natural listening episodes. This methodology was designed to maintain a natural and familiar...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2017; 35160–76 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2017.35.1.60
Published: 01 September 2017
... listened to Stravinsky’s Symphonies of Wind Instruments twice and responded to the music in real time. During the first listening, they continuously rated their level of interest and at the same time mentally identified the major themes. During the second listening, they indicated when they heard the major...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2016; 342192–217 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2016.34.2.192
Published: 01 December 2016
... and cognition of points deemed to be musically salient (Delie`ge, 2007). The role of musicianship in the listener remains an important question, as it can help explain possible transfer effects of music learning. In addition, the difference between listeners real-time and non-real- time annotation...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2019; 372111–133 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2019.37.2.111
Published: 01 December 2019
...Jo Fougner Skaansar; Bruno Laeng; Anne Danielsen T he present study tested two assumptions concerning the auditory processing of microtiming in musical grooves (i.e., repeating, movement-inducing rhythmic patterns): 1) Microtiming challenges the listener's internal framework of timing regularities...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2017; 344424–437 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2017.34.4.424
Published: 01 April 2017
... directly investigated listeners perception of modula- tions in music. Krumhansl and Kessler (1982) investi- gated Western musicians internal representation of pitch relationships and how these representations chan- ged over time while listening to a modulating sequence of chords. Results showed that...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2017; 345541–556 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2017.34.5.541
Published: 01 June 2017
..., results suggest that listeners’ judgments were influenced not only by consonance or pitch class distributions (i.e., by underlying “scales”), as expected from previous research, but also by pitch dispersal. Interestingly, it was also found that Schoenberg’ melodies became not only less diatonic over time...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2015; 3313–11 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2015.33.1.3
Published: 01 September 2015
...-level time course of melodic experiences, and address how the listener/performer identifies a melody as distinct in a complex auditory scene, how expectations unfold in implications and realizations that contribute to coherence, and how hierarchical tonal relationships of stability are detected. The...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2018; 353253–294 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2018.35.3.253
Published: 01 February 2018
..., 2013, accepted June 15, 2017. Key words: continuous responses to music, statistics, time series analysis, agreement, response coordination C ONTINUOUS RESPONSE MEASURES AREa promising means of investigating our experi-ence of music. By sampling aspects of partici- pants responses as they listen, these...