1-20 of 299 Search Results for

accent

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2005; 232165–188 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2005.23.2.165
Published: 01 December 2005
... that carry a rhythmic grouping accent (T2 in TT0, T1 and T3 in TTT0) than on other tones or in the 0 position. Off-beat tapping was more difficult in TT0 than in TTT0 sequences. Experiment 2 showed that a dynamic ( pitch) accent on one of the tones facilitates synchronization with that tone and impedes...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 1991; 83315–334 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40285505
Published: 01 April 1991
...Carolyn Drake; W. Jay Dowling; Caroline Palmer This paper examines the influence of three accent structures on the reproduction of simple musical tunes by 5-, 7-, 9-, and 11-year-old children and adult pianists. In the metric accent structure, periodically spaced beats are accented; in the melodic...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 1996; 134489–516 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40285700
Published: 01 July 1996
...David Huron; Matthew Royal The theoretical and experimental literatures pertaining to pitch-related accent are reviewed. From these literatures, eight competing notions of melodic accent are identified. All eight conceptions of melodic accent were investigated through correlational studies of three...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 1994; 114409–464 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40285633
Published: 01 July 1994
... assumptions. The phenomenal accent of an event depends on the interonset interval that follows it, saturating for interonset intervals greater than about 1 s. The salience of a pulse sensation depends on the number of events matching a hypothetical isochronous template, and on the period of the template—pulse...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 1993; 103343–378 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40285574
Published: 01 April 1993
...Carolyn Drake; Caroline Palmer Perceptual studies suggest that the segmentation of a musical sequence is influenced by three accent structures: rhythmic grouping, melodic, and metric accent structures. We investigate whether performers emphasize these types of accents with systematic performance...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2019; 364353–370 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2019.36.4.353
Published: 01 April 2019
...Ivan Tan; Ethan Lustig; David Temperley W hile syncopation generally refers to any conflict between surface accents and underlying meter, in rock and other recent popular styles it takes a more specific form in which accented notes occur just before strong beats. Such “anticipatory” syncopations...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2003; 204431–464 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2003.20.4.431
Published: 01 June 2003
...Peter Q. Pfordresher Two experiments investigated the perception of melodic and rhythmic accents in musical patterns. Musiclike patterns were created in which recurring melodic and/or rhythmic accents marked higher order periods that, when both accents were present, could differ in terms of period...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2015; 332244–254 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2015.33.2.244
Published: 01 December 2015
...Rasmus Bååth Subjective rhythmization is that phenomenon whereby, when one is listening to a monotone metronome sequence, some sounds are experienced as accented. These subjectively accented sounds group the sequence similarly to how the metrical structure of a piece of music groups the beats...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2005; 223549–562 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2005.22.3.549
Published: 01 March 2005
...Donna Abecasis; Renaud Brochard; Roni Granot; Carolyn Drake Even within equitonal isochronous sequences, listeners report perceiving differences among the tones, reflecting some grouping and accenting of the sound events. In a previous study, we explored this phenomenon of �subjective rhythmization...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 1994; 12157–76 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40285755
Published: 01 October 1994
...Lloyd A. Dawe; John R. Plait; Ronald J. Racine In many theories of meter inference (e. g., Benjamin, 1984; Lerdahl & Jackendoff, 1983), the cues that serve as markers for major metrical accent locations are the basis from which one infers or determines a meter. However, phrase and metrical...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 1998; 154391–401 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40300864
Published: 01 July 1998
...Hasan Gürkan Tekman Melodically accented tones are perceived as having higher intensity. Subjects judged whether or not all of the tones in a sequence were of equal intensity. Melodic accents were created by pitch skips, and the intensity of the tones that followed the skips was manipulated...
Images
Three excerpts from the piano version of the duet that performers played du...
Published: 01 September 2019
FIGURE 1. Three excerpts from the piano version of the duet that performers played during the experiment. Line (a) is the start of the unmetered section, line (b) comes from a section with 5+7/8 meter where primo and secondo are intended to synchronize their accents, and line (c) is the start of FIGURE 1. Three excerpts from the piano version of the duet that performers played during the experiment. Line (a) is the start of the unmetered section, line (b) comes from a section with 5+7/8 meter where primo and secondo are intended to synchronize their accents, and line (c) is the start of More
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2020; 374278–297 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.37.4.278
Published: 11 March 2020
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2020; 374263–277 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.37.4.263
Published: 11 March 2020
... include tempo (BPM), note duration, and event density ( Drake, Gros, & Penel, 1999 ; London, 2011 ; Madison & Paulin, 2010 ; Parncutt, 1994 ). Non-temporal cues include pitch, harmonic progression, tonal movement, loudness changes (i.e., musical accents), timbre, and the listener’s motor...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2020; 374339–346 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.37.4.339
Published: 11 March 2020
... such polyrhythmic structures create “gaps” in which metric accents are not accompanied by objective auditory onsets, motivating listeners to move their bodies in order to physically enact the missing beats. This engenders the intrinsically enjoyable sensation of “…losing [oneself] and…actively becoming...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2020; 374347–358 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.37.4.347
Published: 11 March 2020
... of discussion over many years ( Apel, 1990 ). For the most part, this means that the sequence of accents is somewhat irregular, and there is no overt organization into bars and larger metrical units. Gregorian chant employs a distinct form of musical notation, using four lines rather than five, but...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2020; 374298–322 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2020.37.4.298
Published: 11 March 2020
... versions without dynamics and/or without agogic accents, as well as versions in which the music was reduced to its melodic, harmonic, or outer voice components. The modifications that canceled dynamics and agogics largely preserved the pattern of tension resolution, even if tension ratings were...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2019; 372111–133 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2019.37.2.111
Published: 01 December 2019
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2000; 1811–23 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/40285899
Published: 01 October 2000
.... Musicians and nonmusicians tapped on a drum in synchrony with six musical excerpts, each presented in three versions: mechanical (synthesized from the score, without microstructure), accented (mechanical, with intensity accents), and expressive (performed by a concert pianist, with all types of...
Journal Articles
Music Perception. 2019; 3711–25 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/mp.2019.37.1.1
Published: 01 September 2019
...FIGURE 1. Three excerpts from the piano version of the duet that performers played during the experiment. Line (a) is the start of the unmetered section, line (b) comes from a section with 5+7/8 meter where primo and secondo are intended to synchronize their accents, and line (c) is the start of...