Three experiments on absolute- pitch identification were performed to examine how quickly and accurately subjects with absolute pitch could respond to different pitch classes. Sixty different pitches in a five-octave range were tested. Subjects with absolute pitch tried to identify the tones as rapidly as possible by pressing corresponding keys on a musical keyboard or a numerical keypad, or by naming vocally. Converging evidence was obtained indicating that the speed and accuracy of responses were directly related. In general, responses to the white-key notes on the musical keyboard were faster and more accurate than those to the black-key notes, C and G being most quickly and accurately identified. This seems to reflect the differential accessibility of pitch classes in the long-term memory of the absolute-pitch possessors, which may be interpreted as a consequence of the acquisition process of absolute pitch in early life.

[Footnotes]

[Footnotes]
1
First International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Kyoto, Japan, October 1989.

References

References
Hargreaves, D. J. The developmental psychology of music, Cambridge: Cambridge Uni- versity Press, 1986.
Miyazaki, K. Musical pitch identification by absolute pitch possessors. Perception & Psychophysics, 1988, 44, 501-512.
Miyazaki, K. Absolute pitch identification: Effects of timbre and pitch region. Music Perception, 1989, 7, 1-14.
Oura, Y., & Èguchi, K. Absolute pitch training program for children. Ongaku Kyouiku Kenkyu (Music Education Research), 1982, 32, 162-171. (in Japanese)
Shuter-Dyson, R., & Gabriel, C. The psychology of musical ability (2nd ed.). London: Methuen, 1981.
Ward, W. D., & Burns, E. M. Absolute pitch. In D. Deutsch (Ed.), The psychology of music. New York: Academic Press, 1982.
This content is only available via PDF.