Over the past three years, many of us developed a more humane approach to teaching as we watched our students struggle with Covid-19 at the same time that political unrest shook the world. Across the United States, Latin America, and indeed around the globe, class- and race-based uprisings occurred as the pandemic wreaked havoc. Activists tore down racist monuments in former imperial centers; citizens protested the rise of fascism in Brazil, the United States, and other places; we gathered to demand our governments address global climate crisis. Students and educators of all levels and ranks united in these struggles to confront the escalation of systemic oppression around the world. Finally, folks were joining together to address colonialism’s legacies.

Our students were doubly traumatized, first by the global pandemic and secondly by political unrest. While many BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) students welcomed these political changes after centuries of...

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