Under review here are two art historical studies of the artistic media—painting and textiles—that dominated the church interiors of colonial Mexico and Peru. Aaron Hyman’s intellectually ambitious book tackles a fundamental aspect of colonial painting that is, at last, receiving the dedicated study it merits: the high degree of repetition of painted compositions based on European prints. Maya Stanfield-Mazzi’s well-researched and thoughtful monograph, full of new material, is the first cultural and technical history of ecclesiastical textiles—imported, locally produced, or a combination of the two—highlighting the ways in which Indigenous artisans participated in outfitting the church. Both books share an interest in the peculiar colonial conditions of the makers, and in works that can be considered nonauthorial. Both also track the intermedial interactions generated by the transatlantic media empire: for Hyman, between (European) print and American painting, and for Stanfield-Mazzi, between different types of textiles, as well as print, drawing,...

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