As we move into the winter of 2021, we continue to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic and the unique challenges it poses to academia and the disciplines of art history and visual culture studies specifically. Reflecting on the current state of affairs in Guatemala, a student recently asked me what forms of collective action are appropriate for individuals to take during this time of concurrent social unrest and public health crisis. Fortunately, I had queued up a few slides focused on the resurgence of cacerolazos (known as panelaços in Portuguese) across South America in the last year (fig. 1). From the Spanish cacerola or “stew pot,” cacerolazos gather in public places banging empty pots and pans with kitchen utensils to express disapproval and protest current social conditions. Cacerolazo protests, which began in South America in Chile during...

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