In 1964 the current Museo Nacional de Antropología (MNA) opened its doors in Mexico City. This space was the result of one of the main intellectual projects that guided the configuration of a national identity after the institutionalization of the Mexican Revolution.1 The creation of the MNA was central for the formulation, dissemination, and reinforcement of a homogenizing national narrative based on Mexican Indigenous shared roots. A critical historiographical analysis has shown that this narrative is based on modern national-state politics and discursivities, and thus implies the colonization of native knowledge.2 George Kubler developed one of the first and sharpest critiques of this academic-political configuration.3

Three years before the inauguration of the MNA, Kubler published his “Colonial Extinction” essay.4 In that work, Kubler suggested that “disjunction” was one of the modes of extinction, focusing almost...

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