Recent thinkers I admire have called for renewed attention to art and aesthetics as places “where one goes to think,” in the words of Néstor García Canclini, celebrated Argentine anthropologist.1 In his latest book, Art beyond Itself, a meditation on the intersections between the social sciences and the arts, García Canclini offers the idea that artists “are freer than social scientists to use metaphors to express condensations and uncertain meanings that we cannot formulate as concepts,” adding later, “Perhaps this way of saying things without pronouncing them fully, this imminence of an impending revelation, is the key to the nature of art.” I find García Canclini's observations compelling,...

You do not currently have access to this content.