The invitation to think about contemporary aesthetics in commemorative practices as forms of redress for victims of gross human rights violations came from the legal scholar Yolanda Sierra León at the Universidad Externado de Colombia. Her research addresses the challenge that victims, their legal representatives, and judges encounter when making demands for symbolic forms of reparations.1 At first, I was skeptical and wondered: What could a group of academics, from the comfort of our universities, say about reparations for victims who have endured unimaginable pain and loss? What role could art play for victims who live in precarious conditions, such as the eight million internally displaced in Colombia, the...

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