Latin American and Latinx Visual Culture has established a reputation as a digital platform where scholars and students, artists and activists can work within alternative art-historical methodologies while transforming traditional frameworks for organizing visual knowledge. The creation of new analytical methodologies has the potential to revitalize the academic study of art and visual culture, in particular when those methods of analysis are turned on “difficult objects,” like Latin American and Latinx visual art, that challenge existing ways of thinking about complexity and interconnectedness. While art history continues to grapple with reinforcing its disciplinary relevance in the twenty-first century, the articles and Dialogues presented in this issue of LALVC reshape disciplinary...

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