In 1973, the archaeologist René Millon published two volumes of maps and information on the geography of the city of Teotihuacán, one of the largest cities in the world at its apogee circa 500 CE, when its population grew to an estimated one hundred and fifty thousand people. Millon's maps, which ultimately plotted out nearly fifteen square miles of the city's territory, were a real watershed in the study of this urban center. Teotihuacán is an outlier among urban centers in the pre-Columbian world for many reasons. It was home to multiple ethnic groups from around Mesoamerica; its many works of public art tended to de-emphasize the authority of its ruling...

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