Scholars have long debated tensions and best practices for assessing aesthetics and the local impact of community-engaged art practices. In her book Judith F. Baca, Anna Indych-López adroitly addresses this debate and revises the previous framing of Los Angeles–based mural artist Judith Baca by scholars who “emphasized process, neglecting the importance of the visual in formulating her overall critique of community, history, and the public sphere” (15). Indych-López’s main argument is that “Baca’s cultural production reveals her pioneering role in innovating both the methods and the aesthetics of working with diverse communities, placing her project on the cutting edge of public art practice” (1), which she thoroughly supports through meticulous...

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