Can the tools of Chicana/o/x studies decolonize art history? In this short editorial comment—equal parts original research, testimonio, and activist’s call for change—I reflect on being both an art historian and an ethnic studies scholar, positioned in between the rarefied, privileged world of art history and the activist politics of Chicana/o/x studies.1 

Momentum has been building over the last several years in the various fields that constitute Latin American and Latinx visual culture.2 In 2016 in Chicago, during what organizers dubbed the “Latin Spring,” there were forty-five exhibitions of Latinx art, a record for that city, during the “Latino Art Now!” conference.3 The 2017 Whitney Biennial at...

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