Before countenancing the work at hand in earnest, it is worth contemplating the significance of its publication within ludomusicology. It was only four years ago that the stipulation was made, and accurately so, that “this significant sub-discipline is still tackling fundamental questions concerning how video game music should be approached.”1 The following year, Roger Moseley considered the significance of stories, how they may be parsed, how they might coincide with and recall one another, and the nature of “changing representations of audiovisual narrativity.”2 Both of these propositions resonate strongly with me, and so I cannot help but conceive of Music in the Role-Playing Game: Heroes and Harmonies as a response, either directly or indirectly, to their implied cri de cœur.

My primary thought prior to reading this volume was how the myriad...

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