[Footnotes]

[Footnotes]
1
John M. Lansden, A History of the City of Cairo, Illinois (Chicago: R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company, 1910)
Lansden
A History of the City of Cairo, Illinois
1910
2
"William Penn and the Planning of Philadelphia," The Town Planning Review, April, 1956, pp. 27-39
April
27
The Town Planning Review
1956
3
Report of a committee of stockholders, Cairo City Property, The Past, Present and Future of the City of Cairo, in North America, 1858. Pages 14-19
14
The Past, Present and Future of the City of Cairo, in North America
1858
Lansden, op. cit., pp. 50-52
50
4
Prospectus and Engineers' Report Relating to the City of Cairo, February 18, 1839
Prospectus and Engineers' Report Relating to the City of Cairo
1839
Lansden, op. cit., p. 48
48
5
J. C. Wild, The Valley of the Mississippi, Illustrated, No. 6, December, 1841, p. 89.
Wild
December
89
Illustrated
1841
6
St. Louis Argus
St. Louis Argus
James Silk Buckingham, The Eastern and Western States of America (London, 1842), III, 81
Buckingham
81
III
The Eastern and Western States of America
1842
7
Report of Strickland and Taylor
Report of Strickland and Taylor
Wild, op. cit., p. 87
87
8
Prospectus and Engineers' Report . . . Lansden, op. cit., p. 49.
9
Affidavit by Miles A. Gilbert, February 22, 1866
Lansden, op. cit., p. 89
10
Wild, op. cit., p. 88.
88
11
Buckingham, op. cit., pp. 81-82.
81
12
Report of a committee of stockholders . . . Lansden, op. cit., p. 51.
51
13
Charles Dickens, American Notes (London, 1842), Ch. XII
Dickens
Ch. XII
American Notes
1842
Dickens could not resist a parting shot: .. We came again in sight of the destestable morass called Cairo; and stopping there to take in wood, lay alongside a barge, whose starting timbers scarcely held together. It was moored to the bank, and on its side was painted 'Coffee House,' that being, I sup- pose, the floating paradise to which the people fly for shelter when they lose their houses for a month or two beneath the hideous waters of the Mississippi." Ch. XIV
Dickens
Ch. XIV
.. We came again in sight of the destestable morass called Cairo; and stopping there to take in wood, lay alongside a barge, whose starting timbers scarcely held together. It was moored to the bank, and on its side was painted 'Coffee House,' that being, I suppose, the floating paradise to which the people fly for shelter when they lose their houses for a month or two beneath the hideous waters of the Mississippi
14
Henry C. Long, Report on the Conditions and Prospects of Cairo City (New York, 1850)
Long
Report on the Conditions and Prospects of Cairo City
1850
Long's report was dated September 2, 1850
15
Ibid., p. 10.
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