Although scholarship on twentieth-century Cuban architecture has continued to grow over the past few decades, the topic is by no means exhausted. Victor Deupi and Jean-François Lejeune’s Cuban Modernism contributes to this literature by striving for comprehensiveness. This approach lends it the quality of a survey, especially by comparison to the recent publications on which it relies, but the same wide coverage makes it accessible reading for both newcomers to Cuban architectural history and veterans of the field.1 While highlighting structures desperately in need of more scholarly attention, the book reveals how much work remains to be done, especially regarding the debates around post-1959 architecture designed after the Cuban Revolution and how the narrative spanning the architecture of pre- and post-1959 is constructed.

Each of the book’s chapters is either thematic or typological, and all cover roughly the same three decades, from the 1940s through the 1960s. The introduction...

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