The practices of digital modeling, simulation, and close virtual viewing are becoming more accessible to architectural historians as a result of the significant advancement of technologies for three-dimensional (3D) digital modeling and virtual environment creation. Long-established, large-scale collaborative projects such as Digital Karnak, Rome Reborn, Virtual Harlem, and Visualizing Venice have demonstrated the potential of such methods for the analysis and presentation of destroyed, damaged, and fundamentally altered historically significant objects and spaces.1 The creation of such research environments requires significant resources, including specialized expertise, equipment, and time. However, a number of platforms and tools have emerged as compelling options for scholars seeking to engage 3D modeling as part of their teaching and research without needing major institutional or external grant-funded support. Two such platforms are SketchUp and Sketchfab.2 While both are proprietary, each offers a free tier that can be used in many contexts. These free tiers...

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