Editor’s note: In an ongoing effort to advance conversations on critical contemporary issues in JSAH, this issue features a roundtable that explores ways to decolonize the spatial history of the Americas, curated by guest editor Fernando Luiz Lara, University of Texas at Austin. I would like to thank Dr. Lara for organizing the roundtable, and his contributors for their thought-provoking essays. —DK

I believe we have, by now, a disciplinary consensus that our traditional Eurocentric canon of architectural history is insufficient (albeit fundamental), and that we are indeed making an effort to fill the gaps. The expansion of our knowledge base has been significant in the twenty-first century. The Berkeley school of vernacularism, for instance, has trained two generations of scholars devoted to the study of the totality of our built environment, even if their work is still very U.S.-centric. On the East Coast, MIT’s Global Architectural History...

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