To promote racial justice, architectural historians must challenge the persistence of white privilege within the canons that we have constructed and the archives that are foundational to our research.1 Even when we disrupt canonical narratives by centering the experiences and perspectives of members of marginalized groups, the systemic exclusions that characterize architectural archives and the racial and gender biases that shape practices of collecting may frustrate our best intentions to recover lost voices and “make the invisible visible.”2 As this study shows, such exclusions and biases have led architectural archives to overlook the family and professional papers associated with architects of Japanese ancestry who have practiced...

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