It is not easy to do justice in a necessarily concise review to a tour de force of a book such as Michael Falser's Angkor Wat, with its two large-format volumes totaling 1,150 pages (printed in small typeface) and containing more than 1,400 illustrations, mostly black-and-white but also with color plates at the end of each volume. Falser examines the material and discursive configuration of the religious monument of Angkor Wat in Cambodia by means of archaeological, curatorial, and representational strategies as a world-renowned architectural masterpiece and key symbol of Khmer identity since the late nineteenth century. To investigate these strategies, Falser employs the analytical lenses of...

You do not currently have access to this content.