On Tuesday, 5 December 1899, British photographer Frederick Henry Evans delivered a lecture to the Royal Photographic Society in London; his subject was Lincoln Cathedral, and his talk was illuminated by lantern slides.1 Assuming the role of church attendant, or “verger,” he invited his audience to “enter” the cathedral through its doorways, to “step into” its transepts, and to “ascend” its stairways.2 By generating what might be considered a “temporal hallucination”—to borrow Roland Barthes's description of the photograph—Evans transported his audience to the medieval cathedral.3 As he stated later, in choreographing his lantern-slide lectures he sought to create an “illusion of actuality,” and to “make...

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