Many Polish villages boast remarkable examples of recent sacred architecture. Churches such as Świętej Łucji (St. Lucia) in the Warsaw suburb of Rembertów, Świętego Michała Archanioła (St. Michael the Archangel) in Kamion, in the township of Młodzieszyn in central Poland, and Świętego Franciszka z Asyżu (St. Francis of Assisi) in Mierzowice, Lower Silesia, might at first glance appear to be centuries-old monuments (Figure 1). Upon closer examination, however, they are clearly recognizable as examples of neohistoricist architecture, in which carefully chosen historical references have been combined with late twentieth-century forms and technology. This article makes the case that these buildings are best understood as constituting a...

You do not currently have access to this content.